Seven ways HR can support the health and wellbeing of employees affected by world events

Be it military conflicts, tsunamis, famines or pandemics, international traumas can affect anyone’s mental wellbeing, whether they have a personal connection to the event or not.

Technology has “shrunk” the world to such an extent that events that would have once seemed far away now seem close to home.

During times of conflict or crisis, effective HR strategies become more important than ever to support employees that may be suffering heightened levels of stress and anxiety.

HR practitioners need to be extra perceptive, sensitive and empathetic, but at the same time take an unsentimental leadership position to provide wraparound support.

Easing anxieties with EAPs

EAPs are a benefit that could have been created specifically for times like these.

The counselling sessions, resources and referrals they offer can help tackle a variety of mental health issues that employees may be suffering.

Valuable but often overlooked, it is important to remind all employees how EAPs work and how to access them. To help dispel uncertainty or reluctance to use the service, any concerns about confidentiality should be addressed. It can be helpful to remind staff that employers will have no knowledge of who is using the service, or why.

Engagement with negative news can exacerbate anxiety, but there should be extra awareness of how certain members of staff could be particularly vulnerable.

For those who have personal experience of war zones or refugeeism, events could act as a trigger. Grief support should consequently be made available, or signposted, for those who have lost family or loved ones.

Understanding crisis fatigue

For employees still coming to terms with the physical and emotional fallout of the two-year pandemic, further unrest or political instability risks causing overload. Drained of resilience, they can be susceptible to burnout, a state of physical and mental exhaustion.

The term ‘crisis fatigue’ has been attributed to the burnout experienced in response to extremely challenging events. With traumatic world events occurring back-to-back, employers should be aware of the risks to – and potential vulnerabilities of – employees.

Training sessions to help managers identify the early symptoms workers may be exhibiting can be helpful. Such symptoms may include detachment, impaired concentration or attention, decreased output and performance.

Stress risk assessments, conducted either one-to-one or online, will also help highlight specific mental ill-health indicators and the underlying causes.

Mitigating the sense of helplessness

Thoughts that there is seemingly nothing they can do to help alleviate the suffering of others can lead to employees harbouring feelings of helplessness and frustration.

Implementing charitable initiatives, from sponsored fundraising events to designated volunteer days, offers a way of supporting employees by enabling them to directly engage, provide help and feel a sense of purpose.

Tackling financial fears

A less obvious cause of anxiety may result from the knock-on financial consequences of a crisis. Rising fuel, energy and grocery bills can cause employees to struggle monetarily.

Where applicable, financial wellbeing strategies should be supported by effective communication initiatives, highlighting any existing financial benefits, such as financial education workshops, and if necessary, explaining how these can best be used.

If privacy concerns are an issue, staff can be directed to the government’s Money and Pensions Service, which provides free, confidential and independent money and debt advice.

Prevention, however, is better than cure and it will always be more effective to provide advice and guidance from the outset, rather than employees being increasingly debilitated by mounting debts.

Caring by sharing

Supressing anxieties risks exacerbating them. HR should consequently facilitate opportunities for employees to share and discuss their concerns with others.

This could be via timetabled slots within the working day, or, for example, by making a dedicated room available for those who feel the need to ‘offload’ or vocalise and engage with others.

For those without families or dependants, or for those not in a relationship, the value of being able to talk with colleagues about a pressing concern unrelated to work should not be underestimated.

For those with families, it may well be that the workplace is a better location to articulate their fears. Domestically, they may be reluctant to fully express their concerns.

Having the opportunity at work to vent their apprehensions and concerns openly and honestly, without the fear of impacting others, can offer significant mental health benefits.

The elephant in the room

It should be remembered that concerns are not eradicated simply because they are not acknowledged. Management, departmental heads and team leaders should be encouraged to demonstrate to employees that they are aware external events may be causing anxiety.

This could be achieved by appropriately referencing them in meetings, newsletters, emails and other communications. Empathy can be a powerful resource and if leaders reveal they too have concerns about troubling world events, employees are more likely to feel they are better understood.

Be a flexible friend

Employees with family and friends abroad may be carrying an added emotional burden, calling for a greater level of understanding from management and HR teams.

In some cases, flexible working conditions – from adjustments to working hours to relaxing policies on mobile phone use – can support employees looking to maintain communication with loved ones overseas.

For those planning to look after relatives, host refugees, or balance other conflicting demands on their time, HR should be receptive to requests for extra holiday leave – either paid or unpaid – and additional time off.

An employer of choice

National and international crises are part of the world we live in today. When a solution to one anxiety-inducing crisis is found, inevitably, there will be more natural or man-made disasters to face.

In light of the suffering caused by many world events, it may at times seem trivial to consider the needs of employees, especially those who are not directly impacted. It may also be difficult to understand why their mental health could be affected by problems arising elsewhere on the planet.

That they are affected, however, is a consequence of compassion and shared humanity.

By treating them with sensitivity, kindness and understanding, you will be demonstrating the ‘human’ in HR.

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HR calendar 2022

Tapping into health and wellbeing awareness days provides HRs a chance to encourage healthier living across their workforce. So, for the third year running, to save you time, we have collated some of the key dates to form a handy, downloadable calendar you can use over the next 12 months.

Download the 2022 HR calendar

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Presenteeism in the aftermath of the pandemic

Despite a rise in long-term flexible working, incidents of presenteeism – where employees continue to work when they are unwell – have risen in the pandemic, with workers feeling the pressures to be ‘always on and available’.

In fact, more than three quarters (77 per cent) of employers have observed presenteeism in employees who are working from home in the last year, according to the latest CIPD/Simplyhealth Health and Wellbeing at Work survey report.

The survey also found ‘leaveism’ – working outside of contracted hours or using annual leave to work or when ill – is an issue, with seven in ten (70 per cent) employers observing this unhealthy behaviour over the same period.

Employees’ desire to demonstrate their value, loyalty, commitment or indispensability in times of limited visibility and a heightened concern around job security has contributed to this acceleration.

While more organisations are taking steps to address these issues, more than two-fifths experiencing presenteeism (43 per cent) and leaveism (47 per cent) aren’t taking any action.

Unfortunately, some businesses have had a propensity to turn a blind eye to or even promote presenteeism but with employee burnout, lost productivity and high staff turnover just some of the consequences, the stakes are high.

Presenteeism costs UK employers up to £29bn a year, according to a pre-pandemic report by Deloitte and Mind.  In fact, presenteeism relating to mental health is having more of a detrimental impact than absences.

Here, we outline the steps employers can take to tackle incidents of presenteeism and leavism, from setting clear communications boundaries and reviewing workload management to line manager training and stress management support.

  1. Review policies that discourage sickness absence

 Although many companies have policies to manage absenteeism, presenteeism is rarely afforded the same consideration.

The issue could lie in unclear or aggressive policies and structures used to tackle sickness absence or in ineffective communication – or both.  This leads to a disconnection with employees that causes them to believe they are not able to take adequate sick leave.

According to the ADP Research Institute’s People at Work 2021 report, more than six in 10 (62 per cent) respondents say that their employer is monitoring time-keeping and attendance more closely than ever.

This ‘spotlight effect’ felt by employees in the pandemic could further prevent them from taking the appropriate time off when ill or from sticking to their contractual hours.

Procedures should be reviewed and revised, if required, to promote trust, encouraging employees to take time off when necessary, without them fearing that it might negatively impact their job security.

Corporate policies should be supportive and properly communicated and understood by all managers and employees.

Managers also play a role in the promotion of a healthy, balanced approach to working life.  By practising structured working days, encouraging routine breaks, and adopting and abiding by out-of-hours email policies, managers can be the guiding example to employees.

  1. Strike the right balance

Businesses are faced with a fine balancing act between managing staff back to work as quickly and efficiently as possible and ensuring they do not work through health conditions.

This is where a proactive approach can reap rewards. Case management led by occupational health practitioners can identify early interventions to prevent conditions becoming more serious, through appropriate treatment and workplace adjustments.

This, of course, is more difficult in times of reduced visibility, where the opportunities for intervention are more limited.

According to the People at Work 2021 report, 22 per cent of European employees said that staying healthy was their biggest challenge at work since COVID-19 began.

For many people, juggling their various personal needs while meeting their work requirements has been tricky and a sustained, heightened level of stress and emotional strain will eventually take its toll.

Minor illnesses, such as colds or stomach bugs, can mask more serious health issues, such as stress, so it is important that symptoms are not dismissed as innocuous.

HR professionals and managers should be provided guidance to help them identify the early signs of illness for all workers – remote and office-based – and make informed judgements about when referrals are required.

This can be facilitated through measures such as regular health questionnaires for all staff to one-to-one ‘catch-up’ video calls with line managers.

  1. Implement appropriate benefits schemes

The business cost of presenteeism is comparable to that caused by sickness absence. There is potential for employees to become unproductive or disengaged because they feel they are being overworked or forced to struggle on through illness.

The pandemic has certainly exacerbated this issue.  According to the People at Work 2021 report, fears of job insecurity was an issue for three quarters of European respondents (73 per cent) and prompted them to do things differently in their role – most commonly taking on extra tasks or assuming a heavier workload, or by working longer hours.

In fact, free working time increased significantly, with UK employees putting in the most hours of their European counterparts, after Swiss employees, with 7.8 hours of unpaid overtime a week.

It is important to listen to staff in order to identify health trends and offer the appropriate benefits and wellbeing initiatives.

Mental health is evidently an area that needs increased focus, considering the events of the past year and the stressors that have resulted, so finding ways to reduce stress and anxiety, avoid burnout and create a sense of fairness will be key to maintaining a mentally resilient workforce.

Unfortunately, less than half of employees (47 per cent) said their employer was supporting their mental health, so there is clearly room for improvement.

Health screenings, employee feedback, and claims data can work together to build a picture of the needs of the unique employee population and allow employers to redirect their resources and reshape their offering so that their benefits strategy is fit-for-purpose, robust and truly valuable.

  1. Accommodate and promote flexible working

Flexible working can help an employee who has been off for a long period of time reintegrate back into the workforce and lessen the risk of them becoming ill again from being overworked and overwhelmed.

It can also help employees achieve a more harmonious work-life balance, boosting productivity levels and staving off incidences of employee burnout.

Thanks to advancements in technology, opportunities for flexible working are greater than ever and employees have a legal right for any request for a change in working hours to be formally considered.

But even though the benefits are clear, and flexible working policies could help positively impact presenteeism rates, fear of judgement is a significant barrier to successful adoption.

According to the People at Work 2021 Report, 32 per cent of European employees feel judged for taking advantage of flexible working arrangements, with only 50 per cent feeling empowered to do so.

Furthermore, a significant proportion – 18 per cent of parents and 25 per cent of non-parents – say their managers actually allow less flexibility than that which the company has set out.

Companies must ensure that policies are consistently and fairly applied by managers and implemented as intended.

  1. Open lines of communication

The past 18 months has been taxing for both employees and employers, with economic hardship and business volatility a consistent and unwaning factor.

Unsurprisingly, this has given rise to or exacerbated pre-existing issues, such as presenteeism, leavism, long-term sickness absence, emotional strain, and reduced productivity.

Employers who take proactive steps to find sustainable solutions and support their employees through this challenging time will ultimately benefit from a healthier, motivated and resilient workforce.

Integral to this is the successful communication of and engagement with benefits.

A concerted effort should be made to ensure employees have a clear understanding of the treatment options available to them and that they feel able to seek help from management. Ongoing education around sickness issues, as well as the perils of presenteeism and leavism, can help to open a dialogue and foster a culture of openness and two-way communication.

With the fear of judgement eradicated or greatly reduced, there is greater potential for early interventions, workplace adjustments, and successful returns to work following periods of absence.

One thing that is for certain is that taking positive action to stem the rise of presenteeism is a prudent and conscientious business decision, as a failure to do so could hit productivity and morale at a critical time, as well as leave employees exposed to greater long-term problems.

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Migraines: the invisible illness

Migraine is a common but invisible illness. It is most common among adults of working age yet many employees are suffering in silence.

Migraine attacks can be severe and debilitating, making it difficult to concentrate or complete work tasks. As well as the physical ailments brought about by migraines, the inability to perform at work can cause stress and anxiety around job security.

Here, we look at what employees can do to manage the impact of migraines in the workplace and how to speak to employers about seeking appropriate adjustments to protect health and productivity.

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Pulse Points Summer 2021

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Green team: A sustainable workplace for healthier, happier employees

There has been much talk of us building back greener in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. But what does a green recovery look like for businesses and employees?

Going green in the workplace benefits more than just the environment. By making changes to the office environment and encouraging green habits, employers can positively influence employee health and wellbeing – and in turn boost productivity.

Here we look at four workplace adaptations and initiatives that can help boost business sustainability, while improving the health and wellbeing of workers.

The biophilia route to improved air quality

Although the impact of poor air quality on our health has long been recognised, the issue was brought to the fore this year following the inquest into the death of Ella Adoo-Kissi-Debrah. The government has now pledged to raise awareness of air pollution and has also moved to bring in new legal limits for pollutants.

Covid-19 has made people more conscious of the undetectable in our environment, but awareness of indoor air quality has not always been as prevalent as it has for our outdoor spaces, where fumes from familiar pollutants, notably vehicle exhausts, can often be smelt and tasted.

Air pollution indoors, however, can reach much higher levels than outdoors – typically up to five times(1) – and the consequential effects on workplace health and wellbeing can be extremely damaging.

High levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), and even low levels of pollutants, can cause symptoms in employees that range from headaches and fatigue to nausea, dizziness and eye, nose and throat irritation.

Enriching office spaces with plants can help mitigate the detrimental impact. Studies have demonstrated that plants can help filter the air and are capable of removing chemicals such as benzene, trichloroethylene, and formaldehyde(2). Furthermore, they are effective at reducing concentrations of carbon dioxide.

The psychological and aesthetic benefits of a biophilic workplace – a term used to describe and environment that promotes our connection with the natural world – on employee wellbeing cannot be underestimated either. Greenery and natural environments have been found to reduce symptoms of depression, stress and anxiety(3) .

Moreover, the combined physical and psychological benefits of a ‘green’ office has been proven to boost employee satisfaction, concentrations levels and productivity(4).

Daylight and lighting in focus

A green lens can also be applied to lighting. Maximising employees’ access to windows and exposure to natural light not only reduces a business’s reliance on electric lighting – typically responsible for up to quarter of an office’s energy use(5) – it has been shown to improve staff sleep patterns, productivity and their quality of life.

This is because daylight exposure is linked to regulating our body’s circadian rhythm, which is important for both sleep quality and cognitive functioning.

Indeed, workers in offices that have windows receive 173 per cent more white light exposure during work hours and sleep an average of 46 minutes more per night(6).

Where it is possible to do so, employers should opt for workspaces that maximise natural light, or remodel their existing workplaces.

Where natural light is being utilised, however, the risks of screen glare and the potential for overheating should also be considered. In some cases, this can be addressed by installing electrochromic glass, which when tinted allows for the flow natural light while still minimising glare.

For other businesses, the existing design of their workspaces make the need for electric lighting a necessity. In such cases, innovations in smart lighting and energy-efficient LED technology should be explored. Computer-controlled lighting systems have now been developed that can mimic outdoor daylight patterns, including brighter white in the morning and warmer tones in the afternoon and evening.

Feeling the heat?

Adopting green energy management measures that ensure a ‘thermally comfortable’ workplace can be challenging for employers, with a variety of factors influencing personal levels of employee satisfaction.

According to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the environment should not only take account of air temperature, but also humidity, air speed and surrounding surface (radiant) temperatures. Personal factors include employees’ choice of clothing, their natural tolerance for heat or cold, along with their work and metabolic rate.

Getting the thermal environment right, however, remains an important ingredient to a green, happy and productive workplace.

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992, advises that “during working hours, the temperature in all workplaces inside buildings shall be reasonable”.

What constitutes ‘reasonable’ will depend on the nature of the work being carried out and the environmental conditions of the workplace. According to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), however, the ideal working temperature in a non-domestic building is at least 16°C, or 13°C for strenuous work.

Employees working in uncomfortably hot and cold environments are more likely to lack concentration and research has indicated a four per cent reduction in performance at cooler temperatures and a six per cent reduction at warmer temperatures(7). Ability to perform manual tasks can also deteriorate, which can lead to health and safety being compromised.

It can be beneficial for employees to control their personal environments by being able to adjust thermostats or open windows as needed. In open-plan spaces, where this is more difficult, employers should review opportunities to increase air movement by improved ventilation, direct air movement to reduce draughts and consider the introduction of smart temperature management systems. This can help adjustments to be made based on the number of people in a building or weather conditions, while helping employers to balance green energy management with employee health and wellbeing.

Active design

The introduction of workplace initiatives and facilities that support exercise can also play a role in helping businesses address both environmental and health issues.

Creating an environment that makes it easier for employees to make healthier decisions can encourage positive, health-related behavioural changes, while reducing energy consumption and a company’s carbon footprint.

By providing secure, convenient bicycle storage and shower facilities, for example, and putting a cycle to work scheme in place, companies can establish themselves as cycle-friendly employers. In doing so, they will not only reduce their impact on the local environment and help cut the business cost of congestion, studies suggest they may also benefit from reduced levels of employee sickness absence(8,9).

It should be noted that the government’s Cycle to Work Scheme now includes e-bikes and the original £1,000 cost limit has been removed.

Other initiatives might include a ‘take the stairs’ scheme in applicable office buildings, promoted using motivational internal communications, to encourage employees to walk rather than using lifts. This can help reduce electricity usage, while offering an effective way for employees to incorporate more physical activity into their working days.

Indeed, Public Health England has reported “strong evidence for the effectiveness of interventions to increase stair use(10)”.

(1) US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
(2) NASA study, 1989
(3) Survey of the Health of Wisconsin, 2014
(4) The relative benefits of green versus lean office space, 2014
(5) Health, Wellbeing & Productivity in Offices, World Green Building Council, 2014
(6) Impact of Workplace Daylight Exposure on Sleep, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life, I Chueng, 2013
(7) Effects of thermal discomfort in an office on perceived air quality, SMS symptoms, physiological responses, and human performance, Lan L, Wargocki P, Wyon DP, Lian Z, 2011
(8) Commute and Exercise Survey, Sustrans, 2013
(9) TNO Research, February 2009
(10) Health Matters: getting every adult active every day, Public Health England, 2016

 

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Employee Advice Guide: Are you fit to get back to work after lockdown?

As lockdown lifts and we swap our dining tables for office desks once again, it is important that we don’t lose sight of our health, wellbeing and fitness. It would be all too easy to slip back into old bad habits once we get embroiled in the humdrum of daily commutes and sedentary office or desk jobs

Returning to the real world of work may mean you are more time-stretched as keep-fit time is once again replaced by traffic jams on the daily commute.  We share 6 new fitness trends to try, from eye yoga to Everesting.

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HR Insights Summer 2021

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Employee Advice Guide: Long COVID

Scientists and health professionals are still unclear why some people suffer from persistent symptoms long after the initial infection, or whether they will fully recover. This is mainly due to the wide range of possible symptoms, as well as it not seeming to be linked with how ill you were when you initially had the virus – you may have even been asymptomatic (showing no symptoms at all).

So what do you need to know? Here, we look at the signs you need to look out for and the steps to take to aid your recovery from Long COVID.

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Diversity and inclusion: meeting the needs of all

Companies today recognise the business benefits of a wider talent pool and differing perspectives, from neurodiverse workers to multi-generational teams.

But with a more diverse workforce comes a more varied set of needs.

Organisations are increasingly viewing benefits through the diversity and inclusion lens and examining whether their current provision sufficiently caters for their unique employee population, from broader parental leave to fertility benefits.

According to research by Willis Towers Watson (Emerging Trends in Healthcare Survey), making policies and programmes Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) relevant ranked number three in companies’ top priorities for their health and wellbeing strategy, with one third (39 per cent) planning to improve provision.

Here, we look at the steps companies can take to ensure their benefits package is valuable to its employees, by being inclusive and successfully addressing the needs of the all workers.

Back to basics

Where companies have the opportunity to reinvigorate and reshape their benefits strategies – against the backdrop of the evolving workforce landscape – employee feedback should be regarded as the foundation stone.

It is only through seeking feedback that disparities in need and preference can be identified. By taking such proactive action, companies can ensure that their resources are redirected to benefits that are truly valuable to employees, rather than ones that are effectively redundant.

Inclusivity is not just limited to the types of benefits on offer – the promotion of benefits is equally as important. To encourage employee benefits uptake, benefits communications need to be simple, effective, and engaging to all.

Communicating benefits through different media, such as face to face meetings with line managers, email comms, posts on the Intranet and physical posters in common spaces, can help reach the masses.

Simple changes, such as consulting on benefits preference and bolstering benefits communications, can help companies effectively adapt their offering to suit need, ensure certain demographics are not neglected or alienated, and improve the employee experience.

Understanding the employee population

Research suggests a positive correlation between a comprehensive offering and benefits appreciation.

Willis Towers Watson’s Global Benefits Attitudes Survey (GBAS) 2020 found that 72 per cent of workers who were offered a full flexible benefits scheme, including voluntary benefits, said their benefits met their needs. This contrasts with just 39 per cent who were offered no core or voluntary benefits choices.

Where benefits plans met employee needs, employees were twice as likely to be engaged with their jobs (48 per cent vs 19 per cent) and significantly more likely to remain with their employer (74 per cent vs 46 per cent).

In order to forge a strategy that is valued by all – and subsequently benefit from the significant business gains – companies need to garner full visibility of the employee population and its different demographics.

With so many varying opinions, values and needs to consider, this can be a stumbling block for companies. But a good starting point is to attempt to identify subsets and take their pulse.

Take the generational split, as an example.

According to the GBAS research, Generation Z (those born approximately between 1996 and 2015) are almost twice as likely as Baby Boomers (born approx. 1946-1964) to say they would like paid time off work (21 per cent vs 12 per cent). Health care plans, meanwhile, are more important to younger workers, with 56 per cent of those in their 20s prepared to pay more for more generous health care provision, compared to just 31 per cent of those over 50.

There is also a clear generational divide when it comes to technology adoption and digital health solutions. According to the latest Willis Towers Watson Employee Health, Wellbeing and Benefits Barometer, almost half of young workers (41 per cent) said they would rather use telemedicine services than visit their GP practice, compared to just 16 per cent of those aged 55 and over.

There is evidence, however, to suggest that the appetite for health-tech services is growing and evolving and the generational gap is narrowing.

The coronavirus crisis fuelled a significant increase in demand for such services across the board. A survey by digital health start-up Quin found that usage of health apps increased by 37 per cent in the wake of the virus outbreak, and data from EAP providers suggested that apps are being used most by males aged 45-55.

This illustrates how trends can develop and attitudes swiftly change, highlighting the importance of consistently measuring and gauging interest from a cross section of the workforce.

Having an evolving overview of different demographics and their preferences ensures that no employees are left on the fringe, a culture of inclusivity is fostered, and benefits that are surplus to requirement are retired.

Striking a balance

Research has shown that when it comes to benefits choice, too much of a good thing rings true.

According to GBAS, 62 per cent of employees said that they prefer a moderate amount of benefits options, as they are happy to make choices, but that too many options can be confusing.

The number of affinity benefits and lifestyle products offered via flex arrangements is increasing year-on-year to reflect the discerning tastes and varied requirements of employees, with unconventional perks including paid time off to travel or study, contributions to employee volunteer efforts, complete flexibility on holiday and work hours and student-loan debt reimbursements.

Whilst flexibility and choice can underline a company’s commitment to inclusivity and diversity, it can equally be overwhelming if the benefits choice is abundant, disparate and unstructured.

Instead, employees prefer a shopping experience when enrolling in benefits, with few restrictions on how to spend.

To cater for this, companies should look to offer dedicated tools that support greater personalisation, freedom and control over choice, and to delivery on this objective, intuitive and dynamic technology solutions are essential.

According to the GBAS report, more than half of workers (54 per cent) felt a single online platform, allowing them to review and manage their benefits, would help them most in making benefit decisions, whilst a third (36 per cent) also cited a desire for online materials to help them better understand their available options.

Companies should bear in mind that different platforms are favoured by different populations.

For example, more than half of Gen Z employees (51 per cent) were found to favour exclusive online communication, while this is true for less than one in four (23 per cent) Baby Boomers.

For complex benefits decisions, the report revealed that more than two-thirds (65 per cent) still prefer to talk through their options, one-to-one.

Companies can help ensure high levels of engagement and appreciation by seeking views on best practice for benefits enrolment and making the necessary adjustments based on preference feedback.

Business benefits

It’s clear that diversity and inclusion will have a greater influence on benefits design in the future, in line with and in response to the evolving workplace demographic.

By listening to the views of all workers and forging a tailored and flexible offering that is truly valued by the wider employee population, companies can not only rid their portfolio of redundant, under-used benefits, but create a powerful tool for job attraction and retention.

After all, valued employees deserve valuable benefits – and businesses will reap the rewards of careful, considered and inclusive investment.

 

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